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Street Soldiers TV: Hollywood, Hip Hop and the Casting Couch

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The Harvey Weinstein scandal ignited the public debate about the sexual abuse of women and encouraged many who’d suffered in silence to speak out. But will all the talk lead to real change?

Jesse Reyes’ haunting song “Gatekeeper” details the pervasive casting couch culture in the entertainment industry, a sad pattern experienced by Hollywood A-listers who say it has happened to too many women.

The many allegations against Weinstein are just that, unproven accusations, and they underscore a more widespread problem, according to civil rights attorney Eric Sanders.

“There’s no system in place to really protect people so they’re not taken advantage of,” Sanders said. “And that means both sides.” It just can’t be a conversation among women, said Andrea-Rachel Parker, who plays Destiny on the hit Starz series “Power.”

“The conversation needs to start with men taking responsibility of their actions and then also becoming advocates for women’s safety,” Parker said.

She believes mistreatment of women extends far beyond the entertainment industry. “Sexual harassment isn’t a race thing, it’s not about class, it’s not about race it’s not about one specific work industry,” she said. “It’s all over for everyone.”

All the attention being paid to the accusations against a supremely powerful Hollywood figure does have a positive aspect, according to Dr. Elisa English, a clinical therapist.

“I think now it has given the power back to women,” she said. “They’re able to have this conversation. People believe them, people understand them, and now they’re learning to have empathy for their experiences.”

Many believe that breaking the silence is a step in the right direction.

–LISA EVERS #streetsoldiers #push4peace #metoo #sexualharassment #sexualassault

FEATURED CAST:
LISA EVERS, Host and Executive Producer, Street Soldiers https://twitter.com/lisaevers
SOWMYA KRISHNAMURTHY, Music Journalist and Pop Culture Expert https://twitter.com/SowmyaK ERIC SANDERS, Civil Rights Attorney and Founder of The Sanders Firm, P.C. https://twitter.com/SandersFirmPC
ANDREA-RACHEL PARKER, Actress, Singer and Choreographer https://twitter.com/Power_STARZ
DR. ELISA ENGLISH, Clinical Therapist https://twitter.com/AskDrElisa

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Street Soldiers TV: Combating School Violence in New York City

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The New York City school year got off to a violent start with an increase in deadly weapons and the murder of a student in his school. Now some are calling for tighter security, but others are worried about criminalizing our children.

“When I go to school and I feel like I’m not safe,” Matthew, a middle school student, said. “I think I can speak for all people — it affects you spiritually, mentally and physically.”

Safety fears are a daily reality for a majority of students and teachers, according to the Department of Education’s own survey.

The number of weapons seized in schools is up by nearly 50 percent, with 328 for July 1 to October 1, 2017, compared to 222 for the same period last year. ”

The students have a sense they can do whatever they want in our schools, so they’re bringing in more weapons,” said Gregory Floyd, president of Teamsters Local 237, the union representing school safety agents.

Abel Cedeno, 18, allegedly used a serrated switchblade to stab and kill Matthew McCree, 15, at the Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Management in the Bronx.

Brian Favors, an expert in urban education, said another layer of adult intervention would deescalate these situations before they turn violent.

“We need to really be intentional about looking at how do you create a village in the school,” Favors said. “That means training for teachers in cultural competence, and how to handle conflicts, because a lot of these conflicts could be resolved.”

The tragedy created an outcry for metal detectors, which were promptly installed in the school. Only about 6 percent of New York City middle and high schools have them. The concern by the administration is the undertone of criminalization.

“In addition to the permanent scanners that are in the schools, we have the ability to go to any given school on any given day and do scanning there,” said Assistant Chief Brian Conroy of the NYPD School Safety Division.

A growing number of community leaders and parents say kids should not have to face their fears on their own.

“When you’re trying to focus on school, you also have a whole lot of problems running through your mind, ‘Oh what if I run into this person this day or after school, what am I going to do?'” Matthew said. “That all affects your academics, which will affect the rest of your life, will affect your career. And that’s not good.” Some say school safety measures need to keep up with our changing times. –LISA EVERS

FEATURED CAST: LISA EVERS, Host and Executive Producer, Street Soldiers https://twitter.com/lisaevers

BRIAN FAVORS, M.ED., M.S.ED., Educator, Breaking the Cycle Consulting https://www.culturallyresponsiveteach…

DARRIN PORCHER, PH.D., Criminal Justice Professor and Former NYPD Lieutenant https://twitter.com/DrDarrinPorcher

MATTHEW, Middle School Student

LINETTE TOWNSLEY, NAACP Youth Advisor

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Street Soldiers TV: Hip Hop Humanitarians – Fat Joe, Remy Ma, Jay Z and the Bronx Stand Up for Puerto Rico

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What started out with a rapper from the Forrest Projects in the Bronx posting a plea on Instagram for people to help Puerto Rico has evolved into a massive humanitarian movement with hip hop leading the way.

Hip hop superstar Fat Joe’s from-the-heart message asking for help for the hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico was met with an overwhelming response.

In the Bronx, the five-hour donation drive organized by Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. with Fat Joe picking up the tab for shipping turned into a 24-hour affair.

“It showed the force and the strength of hip hop,” Diaz said. “I’m so proud and thankful to Fat Joe, Jay Z, to Remy Ma, and all those who were able to come together to help the people of Puerto Rico during this time of pain, suffering, and crisis.”

The turnout and the volume of supplies were overwhelming. Jay Z paid for a plane to take the donations to the island, but one wasn’t enough so he added four more. He got Tidal Music involved in a big way by sponsoring a major drive at the Javits Center. It brought volunteers, the music industry, and Army National Guard together for a good cause.

Recording artist Lumidee told me she spent every summer with family in Puerto Rico and that she is proud to see the surge of help and assistance, which now totals 3 million pounds from New York City. She believes Fat Joe’s involvement convinced many to get involved.

A plane full of supplies Joe collected with Pit Bull flew from Miami to Puerto Rico this week. Another plane will leave from New York this weekend. Tidal is putting on a huge benefit concert at Barclays Center later this month.

FEATURED CAST:
LISA EVERS, Host and Executive Producer, Street Soldiers https://twitter.com/lisaevers

RUBEN DIAZ JR., Bronx Borough President https://twitter.com/rubendiazjr

REMY MA, Hip Hop Artist https://twitter.com/RealRemyMa

LUMIDEE, Hip Hop Artist https://twitter.com/thereallumidee

JOELL ORTIZ, Hip Hop Artist https://twitter.com/JoellOrtiz

MELISSA QUESADA, Director of Latino Affairs for Gov. Andrew Cuomo https://www.instagram.com/mquesadaesq/

FAT JOE, Hip Hop Artist https://twitter.com/fatjoe

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Street Soldiers TV: NYPD Town Hall with Rapper Fat Joe, NYPD Chief, Brooklyn Councilman [STREET SOLDIERS EXCLUSIVE]

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How police protect and serve the public, especially communities of color, is one of the most contentious issues in our country. While the debate rages on, the NYPD has been making moves to make sure all city residents get the same protection. But have they gone far enough?

There was outrage on the streets for months after the 2014 illegal police chokehold death of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, followed a few weeks later by the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown halfway across the country.

With frustrations at a boiling point, two NYPD officers were shot and killed in uniform. In an exclusive interview, Police Commissioner James O’Neill told me the tragedies became a turning point. “It was a very difficult time to be a police officer, with the demonstrations every day, Liu and Ramos were brutally assassinated on December 20th,” O’Neill said.

“It was a dark time for the NYPD. I think it was a dark time for the city and I think it was a dark time for the nation, too.”

Public outrage over racial profiling and excessive force intensified with federal scrutiny and outside investigations. That ramped up the pressure to make a drastic change, according to Charles Tucker Jr., a St. John’s University Law School professor.

“From a community standpoint, it represented an opportunity for the NYPD to be accountable,” Tucker said. “They’re looking for someone to be accountable in these instances.”

City Hall got that message. Since then, the mayor said every NYPD officer has been retrained in de-escalation techniques, stop-and-frisk has dropped 93 percent, and complaints against officers have dropped to the lowest level in 15 years. All at the same time, serious crime is at the lowest numbers in decades. It is a “180” from the old “Us vs. Them” approach. The cornerstone is neighborhood policing.

“It’s not a political strategy, it’s a real policing strategy,” O’Neill said. “If you look at the old model of policing, if you were in a sector car, all you did was answer radio runs eight hours a day. You had no time to make a connection to anyone.”

Now it is all about the connection. And nowhere is that strategy more visible than in the Brooklyn North command, where officers routinely check in with local businesses and residents. Assistant Chief Jeffrey Maddrey said keeping people safe is the top priority, with community engagement a close second.

“What I tell my officers, is to be the first,” Maddrey said. “Be first to stick out your hand, and say hello, and shake a hand to greet people.”

O’Neill said neighborhood policing is not just about feeling good. It is a key part of their crime-fighting strategy, along with precision policing as opposed to wide-net sweeps, new investigative techniques, and improved technology. He said the new model is in keeping with the times.

“Giving the police officers discretion, the ability to make decisions, solve problems with the community — if anything that’s what I’m most proud of,” O’Neill said.

Police themselves have changed, with the majority being ethnic and racial minorities and more than half living in the five boroughs. But critics say in some areas, the police department needs to be more proactive in disciplining officers who cross the line.

Street Soldiers held a groundbreaking town hall to discuss these issues with rapper Fat Joe, NYPD Chief of Patrol Terence Monahan, Council Member Jumaane Williams, and Police Officer Eric Morales.

–LISA EVERS

FEATURED CAST: LISA EVERS, Host and Executive Producer,

Street Soldiers https://twitter.com/lisaevers

COMMISSIONER JAMES O’NEILL, New York Police Department https://twitter.com/NYPDONeill

CHARLES TUCKER JR., Partner, Tucker Moore Law Group https://twitter.com/sirchase27 https://twitter.com/tuckerandmoore

ASSISTANT CHIEF JEFFREY MADDREY, Commanding Officer,

Patrol Borough Brooklyn North https://twitter.com/NYPDBklynNorth

CHIEF TERENCE A. MONAHAN, Chief of Patrol https://twitter.com/NYPDChiefPatrol

COUNCIL MEMBER JUMAANE WILLIAMS, 45th City Council District https://twitter.com/JumaaneWilliams

POLICE OFFICER ERIC MORALES, 79th Precinct

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Street Soldiers TV: Tay-K Rap vs Reality Show

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He is a baby-faced teen rapper facing a death penalty murder case. But the 17-year-old artist known as Tay-K is quickly becoming one of the hottest sensations in hip hop and blurring the line between rap music and real life.

Tay-K’s real-life race was with the U.S. Marshals fugitive task force, which labeled him a violent fugitive. In late March, facing a murder charge as a juvenile, he hit the road. For three months, he was making music about being on the run while actually being on the run.

In my exclusive interview with his high-powered entertainment attorney, James McMillan told me Tay-K (https://twitter.com/TAYK47USA) is first and foremost a very young but focused artist.

“Clearly he took a risk by clipping his ankle bracelet and going on the run,” McMillan said. “But simultaneously he had the awareness to make a video and song at the same time.”

On June 30, 2017, the day he was captured by U.S. marshals in New Jersey, Tay-K’s manager released “The Race” song and video. It went viral, racking up more than 40 million views. The song is so popular it broke into the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

“This generation of kids, they’re really savvy about and aware of technology, and appearance,” McMillan said. “And how you can affect the world basically by the press of a button with one visual, one song.”

Taymor “Tay-K” McIntyre’s legal problems are much more complicated. He is charged along with six others in a home invasion that left a 21-year-old man dead. He is also reportedly implicated in another murder while on the run, as well as the brutal assault of a 65-year-old man. Former prosecutor and now a criminal defense attorney Charles Tucker Jr. said “The Race” video could be used in court and the gun play depicted in it especially could hurt his case. ”

Anytime you have a video that looks like it possibly could relate to criminal charges, obviously it’s not something you like to have a defendant involved in,” Tucker said.

Tay-K’s criminal attorney Trent Loftin told Street Soldiers: “Mr. McIntyre wholeheartedly denies these charges and allegations against him… and his entire legal team look forward to our future trial and maintain our innocence. We are certain when all of the evidence is presented, Mr. McIntyre will be exonerated.”

A judge ruled he must be tried as an adult, making the stakes that much higher.

“It’s now a death penalty case based on the serious charges that are now facing him in Texas,” Tucker said.

Whatever the outcome of his legal problems, Tay-K may already have made his mark as a part of a new age of gangsta rap, said Rob Markman, who just dropped his first EP “Write to Dream.” “It’s just in your face, there’s almost nothing poetic about it,” Markman said. “16-, 17-year-old kid, very jarring.”

It is possible rap could turn out to be Tay-K’s redemption. He has vowed that if he beats the charges, he will stop robbing and earn his money in legit ways. Right now behind bars, he is raking in about $2,000 a day from all the video views, his attorney said.

–LISA EVERS

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Street Soldiers TV: Should Violent Hate Speech Be Banned?

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The recent violence that erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, began with a protest by white nationalists over the planned removal of Confederate statues. They had a permit for their initial demonstration.

No matter how offensive their message of white male supremacy and neo-Nazi views were to many, they were within their rights, civil rights attorney Charles Coleman Jr. said.

“Under the Constitution and the First Amendment, there’s no distinction between what’s hateful speech and what’s loving speech, if you will,” he said.

The demonstration turned deadly when a white supremacist sympathizer drove his car into a crowd of counter-protestors, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring dozens of others.

“If speech is going to incite violence, that’s when you’ve crossed the line of it being illegal,” Coleman said. “You can’t advocate openly for violence against any particular group or person. That’s when you start going into the realm of what’s illegal speech.”

The white nationalists who displayed the Confederate flag, a symbol of slavery, were within their legal rights as private individuals. But the symbol still has a role in public institutions and government. It is part of the Mississippi state flag. Civil rights attorney Carlos Moore of the Tucker Moore Law Group is fighting all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court to have it removed.

“I do believe that the state or government actors should not be allowed to display images that celebrate slavery or advocate white supremacy,” Moore said. “I believe that crosses the line and that’s unacceptable.”

Coleman said he believes Charlottesville is not an isolated incident.

“Our ground has been fertilized to have this happen all over the country if we’re not careful,” he said.

So, can a distinction be made between free speech and hate speech? And if hate speech leads directly to violence, should it be banned? Street Soldiers host Lisa Evers poses those questions and more to a distinguished panel of contributors.

What do you think? Comment in the space below.

FEATURING:

LISA EVERS, host of Street Soldiers
https://twitter.com/LisaEvers

EVAN BERNSTEIN, New York regional director, Anti-Defamation League
https://twitter.com/bernstein_evan

CHARLES COLEMAN JR., civil rights attorney
https://twitter.com/CFColemanJr

FRED THE GODSON, hip hop artist
https://twitter.com/FREDTHEGODSON

CARLOS MOORE, civil rights attorney
https://twitter.com/Esquiremoore

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Street Soldiers TV: Push 4 Peace 2017 Featuring DMC, DJ Enuff, Jazzie Belle and Others [A Street Soldiers Special]

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Street Soldiers host Lisa Evers, of Hot 97 and Fox 5, gathered a diverse and illustrious panel for the 2017 Push 4 Peace town hall in Brooklyn.

Lisa started the Push 4 Peace series seven years ago in Newark to address gun violence and always focused on positive alternatives for youth. This summer, Street Soldiers took a different twist: how hip hop can change our lives and our communities.

The pre-show event featured Street Soldiers DJ Michael Medium, refreshments, and even video gaming with the champion known as Hip Hop Gamer. While the crowd enjoyed the music, Lisa caught up with some of the celebrities on the red carpet, including Josh X and DMC.

Youth groups came out to Brooklyn Borough Hall to take in lessons learned and advice from our diverse panel, including Hot 97’s own DJ Enuff.

Lisa took questions and comments from the audience, too. There was a lot to learn about the positive power of music from our awesome panel.

Music producer Buda Da Future, hip hop legend DMC of Run-DMC, DJ Enuff of Hot 97, music journalist Sowmya Krishnamurthy, Brooklyn’s own rap star PHresher, and model/podcast host Jazzie Belle share the secrets of their success on this special episode of Street Soldiers

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Street Soldiers TV: Should Rikers Island Be Closed or Reformed?

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In June, Fox 5 went inside Rikers Island for an exclusive town hall with Fat Joe, inmates and the Department of Correction. We were shown the best. But we weren’t allowed to see a lot more.

A former inmate, now free on bail with an ankle bracelet, is awaiting trial for attempted murder. He told me they’re dehumanized from Day 1.

No one denies the do-or-die culture. COBA, the correction officers’ union, said slashings and stabbings of guards are increasing.

A Rikers Island correction officer is breaking his silence so people know what is really going on. He said the violence has to stop. Fox 5 is protecting his identity for his safety. He said an inmate stabbed him three times in the ear. The officer went back to work at Rikers after treatment, but he hasn’t been the same, he told us.

Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a 51-page report on how Rikers could be closed. Overpopulation is one factor in the violence. Another is inmate idle time. Job training programs like those in G.M.D.C. have certified more than 1,500 inmates, a fraction of the jail’s roughly 8,000 inmates.

Deputy Commissioner Winette Jackson said positive change takes time.

“A large part of our job, our mission, is to really help, correct and rehabilitate the individuals who are in the custody of the department,” she said.

The start of a culture shift is seeing some improvement in inmate-officer contacts in G.M.D.C. The programs are in demand. There aren’t enough to go around.